Home | Program Information | Research | Education | Enrichment | Participating Groups | In the News | Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots Animal Projects| JGI Global  Management Projects

Chimpanzees Living in Zoos

Not all chimpanzees live in their natural African habitats, free to move about their territory in search of food and other chimpanzees. About 500 chimpanzees live in zoos in the United States alone. Some of the older chimpanzees in zoos today were born in the wild and captured for sale. Wild caught zoo chimpanzees are members of the "founder population" or chimpanzees not related to any chimpanzees already in zoos. The oldest chimpanzee in an American Zoo is a female, Little Mama, who lives in Lion Country Safari, West Palm Beach, Florida. Estimated to be born in 1938, she is thought to be nearly seventy years old.

Chimpanzees that make up the current zoo population are living longer than their predecessors. The current mean age of zoo chimpanzees is in the mid twenties. This low figure is due to a very high infant mortality rate. Infants born today that survive infancy can expect a longer life span because of an accumulation of knowledge of chimpanzee care gained over the past half century. They live in more natural and suitable housing, their diet is designed to be nutritious and appropriate for their digestive systems, and daily enrichment objects and activities increase mental stimulation while decreasing boredom, depression and lethargy.

 

It is important for people visiting zoos to remember that chimpanzees are highly intelligent creatures capable of complex social behaviors, such as tool use and tool making. Social, by nature, chimpanzees suffer greatly when housed alone. People watching chimpanzees in zoos are often surprised at the similarity of chimpanzee bodies and behavior to their own. When approaching or watching chimpanzees in zoos, humans should respect their privacy, keeping their voices low and refrain from loud boisterous behavior.

 


Home
Chimpanzee Learning Cards

A.

ChimpanZoo Learning Cards
1.
Origins and Habitat of Chimpanzees

2.

Chimpanzee Social Groups
3.
Chimpanzees Living in Zoos
4.
Infancy and Childhood
5.
Chimpanzee Adolescence and Gender Specific Roles
6.
The Importance of Mothering
7.
Mothering and Play
8.
Play
9.
Depression
10.
Dominance Displays
11.
Submission
12.
Contact
13.
Grooming
14.
Food
15.
Territorial Behavior
16.
Chimpanzees Are a Lot Like Us
17.
Communication
18.
Chimpanzees Are Individuals
19.
Mike's Ingenious Idea
20.
Mike (1938-1975)
21.
Mike the Alpha Male
22.
The Human Threat to Wild Chimpanzees
23.
Dr. Jane Goodall, DBE
24.
The Jane Goodall Institute
25. Books by Jane Goodall
26. Bibliography

 

Home

Program Information
   Participating Groups
   History
   

Research
 
About Data Collection
  About the Query Site
  About the Public Database

Log on to Research
 
Chimpanzee Behavior Query
  Public Database

Research Papers

Password Required
  Local Administrators Page
  Data Collection Program

 

Education
     
Chimpanzee Behavior Note cards
     Lesson Plans     

         I Remember Susie  

Instruction Manuals

ChimpanZoo Data System Guide

Enrichment

www.janegoodall.org

Contact Information

ChimpanZoo
the Jane Goodall Institute
1595 Spring Hill Rd, Suite 550
Vienna, VA. 22182
Phone: (703) 682-9200

ChimpanZoo Webmaster

 

Intute: Nature is a gateway to quality evaluated internet resources in the natural world, coordinated by the Natural History Museum, London. Intute: Nature is part of Intute: Health and Life Sciences, an integrated collection of internet gateways covering health and the life sciences. ChimpanZoo is proud to be a part of this science learning experience.

Copyright © ChimpanZoo: Research, Education and Enrichment 2003